Leaves Of Mulberry Trees Are Eaten By

Fritz Gastreich, who started at the Model Rail Experience in 2008, did so after moving he and his wife to Kansas City from Minnesota. He was just a plethera of information on trolley cars that can still be seen in Kansas City, Depots he knew I (or any rail fan) would enjoy visiting in Baldwin City and Lawrence, Kansas, and reminded me about the Depot in Kearney, Missouri that I was already aware of as I am from the Northland, and at the time of our conversation was planning to but by the time of this posting already have visited as part of the Legacies On The Rails Road Show. It was obvious from the gleam in his eye and his infectious smile, that Fritz absolutely loves being a part of the Model Rail Experience staff as well as discussing all this great railroad history, as well as about efforts to preserve it.

In blueberries, studies have shown that absorbed water through the skin is one reason, but also via root system uptake (although less so than direct contact). The incidence of rain caused splitting is very cultivar dependent and that cultivars with firmer fruit may be more susceptible to splitting. What, within the fruit itself, could lead to this? Some studies have suggested that in some cultivars the amount of air filled spaces between cells could allow more water to enter but not split.

I apologize for any mistakes in notation and/or spelling. Several songs are transcribed from oral presentations, and there may exist other/similar versions, as with most folk songs. As for the translations, the idea is to get the main meaning and gist of the song.

During September I also spend many hours at the top of First Field, sitting on Alan’s Bench and watching migrating monarch butterflies. One morning I was there by 9:00. Fog filled the valleys, but sun illuminated our 37 acres of goldenrod and asters.

In 1813, Charles James Mason received a patent for what he called “Mason’s Patent Ironstone China.” He coined the name “Ironstone” to imply that the material was as durable as ferrous metal and rock. This product soon became popular with the consuming public and remains popular to this day.Other potters were making wares similar to Mason’s Patent Ironstone, and they called their products such names as “Granite China,” “Stone China” and “Opaque China.” One of the companies that produced this type of earthenware was Davenport, which was founded in Longport, Staffordshire, England in 1793 and remained in business until 1887.Reportedly, they started making their “Stone China” in 1805, and continued marking items with this name until about 1820 or so.The first clue is the color of the transfer printed decoration, known to collectors as “mulberry.” It is brownish purple, and got its name because the color was supposed to resemble the juice from crushed mulberries.This rather somber hue first came into popularity in the 1830s, and it remained in fashion until the 1850s. This means that the platter in today’s question was probably made in that time period.

Leave a Reply