Mulberry Lily Mini Blue

Like a Creature from the Black Lagoon, Toor Roo Dun was a terrifying bogeyman of the native peoples, an unspoken menace that lurked just beyond the edge of sight, an equal part measure of Aboriginal doubt and fear. If truth be known however, the story may have been told to gullible settlers as part of an ongoing Aboriginal prank, so as if to up the ante, the settlers themselves managed to turn the whole business of the bunyip into political satire. In 1853 the Australian journalist, orator and politician, Daniel Deniehy, famously derided the attempts of the squattocracy to introduce a titled, hereditary aristocracy into colonial society by calling the concept a jumped up “Bunyip Aristocracy”, by which ipso facto decree he implied, it didn’t exist..

Multiple unit urban starts were relatively unchanged at 96,659 units in March, CMHC said.Separate data showed Canadian building permits rose 1.7% in February after a 1.8% gain in January. Market players had expected a February gain of 4.3%.Permits for the nonresidential sector jumped 18.9% and residential permits fell 7.2%.In line with the softening trend in the housing market since mid 2012, permits for multi family housing fell 19.1% in February, the seventh decrease in eight months, Statscan said.Permits for single family houses rose a tepid 1.1%. Municipalities approved 14,071 new residential buildings in February, down 12% from January..

But more important: I grew up in a time when children played singing and dancing games, and we threw a small ball on any available wall while chanting rhymes. We even did this in the school yard. We also did a lot of rope skipping to chants and Chinese jump rope games with elastic bands.

The big problem staring him in the face is the crisis in the farming sector. For one, he’s faced with a farm loan waiver crisis that saw prolonged agitations. The state govt eventually capitulated, agreeing to loan waivers worth 34,000 crore rupees or $5.1 billion.

Another story we failed to note was last week piece in The Wall Street Journal about an obscure case involving Dick Cheney during the disputed 2000 election which offers a rare glimpse into a Constitutional battle that Supreme Court nominee Harriet Miers took on. What makes the piece interesting given the uproar about her expertise in Constitutional law is that it shows she won the case by arguing for a and inclusive reading of the Constitution, style of legal interpretation more commonly associated with liberal leaning judges than conservatives. Now ain that a kick in the head?.

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