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Tuck everlasting is a short, but very intriguing book that any age could read and enjoy. Winnie, and only child is sick of all the attention she is getting, so she runs away to the wood. She meets a suspicious boy named Jesse who is drinking out of a spring.

Adapted from Martha Stewart Living Magazine. Questions should be addressed to Ask Martha, care of Letters Department, Martha Stewart Living, 11 W. 10036. 18 great things Bath has given to the worldYou’re welcome : )ByBronte HowardTrainee news reporter06:00, 31 DEC 2017Uranus, pictured with its moons, was discovered in Bath (Image: Getty Images) From the priceless historical value of the Roman Baths and the crowning of King Edgar here in 973 through to Bath being the nation’s only World Heritage City today, there’s plenty to be proud of.But the city has has also given plenty more to the world besides these.From inventions and discoveries we take for granted today to fantastic contributions in food, drink, medicine, literature and music, Bath has plenty to shout about.William Harbutt began creating a small scale production in his basement, with the original colour being grey, but it was later moved to a factory in Bathampton.The amazing Pulteney Bridge at nightAnd Bath has helped provide the beautiful scenery for many other TV shows and movies, including Persuasion, The Duchess and Sherlock, bringing stars such as Keira Knightley, Benedict Cumberbatch and Judi Dench to the city.6. Sally Lunn BunsSome describe it as Bath’s finest delicacy and versions of the brioche style bread can now be found across the globe.The Sally Lunn Bun was invented by Sally Lunn who came to Bath in 1680 after escaping persecution in France. It is still baked in one of the oldest houses in the city which is now a caf where you can try an original yourself.Abbey Ales’ Bellringer is a big favourite with beer drinkersFor a taste of Abbey Ales own beers head to one of the brewery’s pubs in the city, The Star Inn, The Assembly Inn, the Trinity inn or the famously cosy Coeur de Lion.8.

At nearby Eaglemont, where elm trees were once saved at the expense of those in Yallambie, the forester William Ferguson planted a great pinetum, the largest in the colony, on the summit of “Mount Eagle” for J H Brooke as a prelude to a grand estate envisaged for that place. The first curator of the Geelong Botanic Gardens, Daniel Bunce visited in 1861 and recorded that “under the skilful management of his gardener Mr Ferguson”, Brooke had accumulated “the largest number of conifers of any establishment in the colony”. The house was never built and Ferguson left the project in 1863 with Brooke himself leaving for Japan four years later.

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